Arachova

Arachova

Arachova is a mountain town and a former municipality in the western part of Boeotia, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is a municipal unit, part of the municipality Distomo-Arachova-Antikyra. Its name is of South Slavic origin and denotes a place with walnut trees. It is a tourist destination due to its location in the mountains, its traditions and its proximity to the town of Delphi.
Nearby Arachova, modern ski facilities are popular with visitors. Although contemporary culture tends to outdo regional folklore, the town maintains some local customs and demonstrates them at celebrations on 23 April, in the honor of the patron Saint George.
Arachova has a panoramic view, uphill small houses and the cobbled streets show a picturesque architecture. The town center includes a huge and steep cliff, the Bell Tower, covered with dense ivy. At the top of the tower is a large 10m height clock. Arachova is famous for its black wine, its “brusque”, the colorful textiles, carpets and rugs, handicrafts and woodcut creations as well.

Parnassos Ski Resort

The slopes of Mount Parnassus are composed of two ski sections, Kellaria and Fterolakka, which together make up the largest ski center in Greece. A smaller ski center (only two drag lifts) called Gerontovrahos is across a ridge from Kellaria. Parnassus is mined for its abundant supply of bauxite which is converted to aluminium oxide and then to aluminium.
The construction of the ski resort started in 1975 and was completed in 1976, when the first two drag lifts operated in Fterolaka. In 1981 the construction of a new ski area was completed in Kelaria, while in winter season 1987–1988 the chair lift Hermes started operating and connected the two ski areas. Both ski resorts continued expanding and in 1993 the first high-speed quad in Greece was installed, named Hercules. In 2014–2015 two new hybrid lifts were installed along with a new eight-seater, replacing the old infrastructure.
Today the Ski Center operates with 16 lifts, two hybrid ski lifts which combine an eight-seater Cabin and a six-seater chair, an eight-seater Cabin, a 4-seater chair lift, a 2-seater chair lift, 6 drag lifts and four baby lifts. The ski center boasts 25 marked ski runs and about 15 ski routes of 36 km (22 mi) total length while the longest run is 4 km (2 mi).

Hosios Loukas Monastery

Hosios Loukas is a historic walled monastery situated near the town of Distomo, in Boeotia, Greece. It is one of the most important monuments of Middle Byzantine architecture and art, and has been listed on UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites, along with the monasteries of Nea Moni and Daphnion. The monastery is situated at a scenic site on the slopes of Mount Helicon. It was founded in the early 10th century AD by the hermit, Venerable Luke of Steiris, whose relics are kept in the monastery to this day. St Luke, was a hermit who died on 7 February 953.
The main shrine of the monastery is the tomb of St. Luke, originally situated in the vault, but later placed at the juncture of the two churches. The monastery derived its wealth (including funds required for construction) from the fact that the relics of St. Luke were said to have exuded myron, a sort of perfumed oil which produced healing miracles. Pilgrims hoping for miraculous help were encouraged to sleep by the side of the tomb in order to be healed by incubation. The mosaics around the tomb represent not only St. Luke himself, but also hegumen Philotheos offering a likeness of the newly built church to the saint.

Galaxidi

Galaxidi, is a town and a former municipality in the southern part of Phocis, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Delphi, of which it is a municipal unit. The municipal unit has an area of 126.088 km2.
Galaxidi has a small harbor on the north coast of the Gulf of Corinth. It is 7 km southwest of Itea, 15 km southwest of Delphi, 17 km south of Amfissa and 48 km east of Nafpaktos. The Greek National Road 48 connects Galaxidi with Nafpaktos, Itea and Delphi. Galaxidi is a 2.5h to 3h drive from the capital Athens and a relatively popular weekend retreat. The territory of the municipal unit hosts the site of the ancient town of Chalaeum.

Corycian Cave

The Corycian Cave is located on the slopes of Mount Parnassus, in Greece. In the mythology of the area, it is named after the nymph Corycia; however, its name etymologically derives from korykos, “knapsack”. A modern name for the cave in some references is Sarantavli, meaning “forty rooms”. This cave was sacred to the Corycian Nymphs and the Muses, and a place of worship for Pan.
Traditionally the cave has been a place of refuge for the surrounding population during foreign invasions e.g. from the Persians in the 5th century BC, the Turks during the Greek War of Independence, and from the Germans in 1943.

Delphi Museum

Delphi Archaeological museum is one of the principal museums of Greece and one of the most visited. It is operated by the Greek Ministry of Culture (Ephorate of Antiquities of Phocis). Founded in 1903, it has been rearranged several times and houses the discoveries made at the panhellenic sanctuary of Delphi, which date from the Late Helladic (Mycenean) period to the early Byzantine era.
Organised in fourteen rooms on two levels, the museum mainly displays statues, including the famous Charioteer of Delphi, architectural elements, like the frieze of the Siphnian Treasury and ex votos dedicated to the sanctuary of Pythian Apollo, like the Sphinx of Naxos. The exhibition floor space is more than 2270 m2, while the storage and conservation rooms (mosaics, ceramics and metals) take up 558 m2. Visitors are also catered to by an entrance hall, a cafeteria and a gift shop.

Vagonetto

The Vagonetto tour gives the visitor the opportunity to see the bauxite mining process step by step. The acquaintance with the history of bauxite starts from the old mine, Stoa 850, continues with a tour of the Mining History Exhibition Area and the interactive visit to the Digital Technology Area and ends with a walk in the Outdoor Exhibition of Machinery. The objective of the Fokida Mining Park is not only to present the premises of a mining operation but to inform, entertain and educate the new generations on the history of exploitation of bauxite and the people who worked on it, honoring and projecting the mining history of Fokida.